10 CivicTech use cases: A tour around the world

Image for post
Image for post
Source: https://knightfoundation.org

This is a #TwitterDemocracy [1] kind of world. Social media alone, are a digital participation form 24/7. We are shifting from one off events like voting to a very interconnected world. With smart cities, we will provide realtime feedback which swiftly makes the loop into all platforms and into our life. Technology can help us become more efficient and arrive to consensus at local levels much faster and better than we are able today.

For this however to happen, we need to improve literacy at all levels. Digital literacy is paramount to include everyone in this new future world.

CivicTech

There is no clear definition of what CivicTech is and there is a lot of debate which actually gets very political. We can start thinking of CivicTech as any technology that upgrades governments and community governance. So, you are allowed to think of it also as including technologies that reshape democracy. People even include any technology use case that is for common good.

I am only here to share a primer on CivicTech through some live use cases from around the world.

The father of Civictech is the UK project FixMyStreet and in the US, Change.org. These are using crowdsourcing community feedback, ideas and project requests to improve budgeting decisions.

Various technologies are being used in CivicTech, from text messages, to app like dashboards and online voting systems of all sorts. These are powered by chatbots, AI and even blockchain technology.

In Brazil in Porto Alegre, one of the most populated cities in South Brazil, the World Bank introduced participatory budgeting as early as 1989. Citizens present their demands and priorities for civic improvement. This use case is one of the longest standing CivicTech implementations. Because of the increased investment in sanitation and health, the processes have reduced infant mortality. In addition, the tax collection rate has improved more than 30%. One of the learning of CivicTech implementation in underdeveloped areas (where it is mostly needed) is that quantifiable results become evident typically after a 5yr period. So, these are not quick wins.

In Argentina , the city of Rosario, has been the test ground for a gender mixed participatory budgeting approach, aiming to involve more women in the participatory budgeting process, and to raise awareness around gender issues and the positive impact of female participation.

New York has an interactive map — the Idea Collection Map — that any community member can submit an idea. Community volunteers, called Budget Delegates review the ideas and turn them into real proposals for a ballot, with input from city agencies. These proposals will be up for a community-wide vote. This Participatory Budgeting process is being used to directly decide how to spend at least $1,000,000 of the public budget in participating Council Districts.

Paris has decided to allocate 5% of its investment budget to be handled through participatory budgeting. This started in 2014 and is planned for a 6yr period (until 2020) and encompasses a total of 0.5billion euros. The issues that have brought up by the community are urban agriculture, greening the city, and caring for refugees and homeless people.

In China, a unique participatory budgeting project started in Chengdu in 2011. This is a city of close to 15million people. Since the start of this process, there have been 50,000 small projects approved. Most them are for basic local services in infrastructure, such as village roads and water supply. The unique design of the implementation is that the citizens have the choice to either spend the participatory budgeting resources on immediate actions, or to use them as a down payment on a collective loan for much larger projects. If the latter is chosen, then the loan is repaid by a part of the participatory budget in the following years.

In Taiwan, Cofacts is a chatbot to crowdsource scams, harming rumors and any kind of misinformation. Essentially this is technology used to self-organize and combat. digital hoax.

DecideMadrid is a Civitech portal for the city of Madrid with 400,000 users. Ideas are crowdsourced and if backed by 1% of the city`s population (approximately 27,000) it goes to a referendum.

In the US, Vallejo a city in California’s San Francisco Bay Area, has been using technology for participatory budgeting courtesy of the Stanford Crowdsourced Democracy Team since 2012. There have been 5 voting cycles to allocate over $8million to fund 27 projects. Vallejo reports that 20,000 residents of Vallejo have participated. Unfortunately, during a recent vote (Cycle 6) there was a loss of all votes due to human errors and people are asked to revote.

My interest to look into CivicTech, is fully credited to Costa Vayenas, the director of the Procivis Think Tank and author of the book Democracy in the Digital Age.

[1] I am using #TwitterDemocracy as a generic term.

Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post
Image for post

Written by

№1 Finance Global Woman Influencer by Refinitiv 2020 & 2019. Fintech & Blockchain Advisor: 30yrs FINANCE; #fintech #blockchain

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store